Many businesses rely on left-brained leadership: watching numbers, cutting costs, seeking the lowest price. Analytics and quantification are used to make business decisions, which often leads to a disproportionate focus on the bottom line. What this leadership style fails to acknowledge is the value of interpersonal relationships.

The success of many businesses depends on people coming together and working well as a team. Why, then, is it such a foreign concept for business leaders to invest time, energy and resources into cultivating relationships among their staff?

Right-brained leadership focuses on bringing emotion, creativity, and vulnerability into the workplace to engage the minds—and the hearts—of employees. It means taking a long-term perspective on relationships with a people-before-profits approach and investing in a work environment that brings positivity to the lives of staff members and a culture that values treating people right.

Happy, engaged and empowered employees will naturally make for happy clients, repeat customers and a better business overall.  When employees love what they do and love who they work alongside, they are more productive (which, for our left-brain readers, lowers overhead).

A right-brained leader knows that strong, deep and productive relationships require a level of vulnerability to build trust. However, we understand that not everyone is a natural at interpersonal relationships. It’s important to recognize the value of a right-brained approach, and to commit to learning the skills necessary to be that kind of leader.

Training your management to build real relationships with employees can transform gifted supervisors into inspirational leaders.  Try to elevate communication and connection measures to equal footing with income and operating metrics.

Employees recognize and are affected by the difference between owners who view them as numbers, and those who display humility and vulnerability.  Those who work to build trust will create a culture of commitment, collaboration, accountability, and performance.

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